The Tea Blog

How to Naturally Decaffeinate Tea

Posted by Mary Ann Rollano | 0 Comments

Tea usually refers to a single species of plant, camellia sinensis, native to Southeast Asia and all tea from this plant contains caffeine. Green, black, oolong and white tea all come from camellia sinensis. Most herbal teas come from a variety of different plants and do not contain caffeine, however, there are exceptions such as yerba mate or guayusa. The amount of caffeine varies depending on the amount of time and temperature the tea leaf is infused, as well as the type of tea. In general, black tea contains the most caffeine.

A cup of normal black tea contains 40–50 mg of caffeine, roughly half the content of a cup of coffee. Sometimes even that amount may be too much for those sensitive to caffeine. The caffeine in tea has a different effect than caffeine in coffee, as it doesn't produce a jolt or let down. This is due to the combination of caffeine and L-theanine uniquely found in the camellia sinensis plant. 

L-theanine, an amino acid, is only found in tea and some mushrooms. It relaxes the mind without inducing drowsiness, hence the calming effect often attributed to tea. This combination of caffeine and l- theanine is how tea improves mental focus.

The problem is not all of your favorite specialty teas come in a decaffeinated version. The only choice readily available for decaffeinated tea is a bland, stale version of a low grade commercial black or green tea.

There is a method to reduce the caffeine in tea at home using the quick rinse method. This is safe and avoids the use of chemicals to remove caffeine. Commercially available decaffeinated tea removes the caffeine using either liquid carbon dioxide or repeatedly rinsing with methylene chloride or ethyl acetate. That just doesn't sound appealing to me so I prefer the natural process of removing caffeine using water.

Simply discard the tea from the first brew after a three-minute infusion. This removes 46 to 70 percent of the caffeine from a cup of black tea. It is important to note the discarded first brew must be made at the recommended brewing temperature for that specific tea. Black tea brews at 212 degrees Fahrenheit.

Now you can re-use your washed tea leaves for a lower caffeinated brew, although it will not technically be decaffeinated. True decaffeinated tea has 97 percent of the caffeine removed, or 4 mg of caffeine per serving.

Using the quick rinse method will yield an average of 18 mg of caffeine per serving. This is usually enough of a reduction for those wishing to moderate their caffeine intake. You can steep most loose leaf teas a second or even third time. If you use a high quality specialty loose leaf tea, you will not loose flavor in subsequent brews.

This information is based on the Asbury College Study on Tea Caffeine.

Until next time - drink tea and carry on dear tea friends!

Posted in caffeine, decaffeinate tea, health, l-theanine, specialty tea, tea

Real Tea For A Summer Day

Posted by Mary Ann Rollano | 0 Comments

Article from Edible Jersey Magazine Summer 2014

 

REAL TEA FOR A SUMMER DAY

tidbitsTea
Photograph courtesy of MaryAnna’s Tea

A lifelong tea lover, Mary Ann Rollano always had a fresh pitcher of iced tea in her fridge, but it took a layoff from her job as a registered nurse for her to turn it into a business.

“I drink iced tea all the time and could never find a good bottled one,” she says. “I often thought, ‘I make a better-tasting tea than this!’” As a challenge to herself, Rollano began working with the Rutgers Food Innovation Center five years ago to try to bring her tea to the masses. Rollano was committed to producing an all-natural product, using real tea leaves, lightly sweetened with lemon juice and pure cane sugar. She soon discovered that many bottlers refused to brew tea leaves (which result in a waste product) and most wanted to substitute lemon juice concentrates for real lemon juice.

It took some time, but Rollano finally found the right fit (the bottler donates the discarded tea leaves to a pig farmer), and the hard work has paid off. Her bottled iced tea was awarded first place in the 2012 North American Tea Championship for best flavored black tea. Rollano, who interacts with her customers at tastings in various food stores across the state, says, “Many are surprised to learn what real brewed iced tea tastes like.”

Rollano also pays homage to her Jersey Shore home; her labels showcase a perfect summer day at the beach, complete with surfer girls and an old-fashioned woody wagon. MaryAnna’s, though named for its creator, is a family affair. Those girls on the label just so happen to be her daughters, and her husband makes the deliveries— in that woody.

MaryAnna’s teas are sold directly through the company’s website and in specialty stores and markets throughout New Jersey.

—Nancy DePalma

MaryAnna’s Tea
Point Pleasant
877.267.8898
maryannastea.com

Posted in Edible Jersey, health, iced tea, North American Tea Championship, summer, tea

Apple Banana Tea Smoothie

Posted by Mary Ann Rollano | 0 Comments

 Apple Banana Tea Smoothie

 

I have been making a lot of fruit smoothies lately. I make mine dairy free but add protein in a variety of other ways. Here is one I created yesterday that got rave reviews from my smoothie drinking daughters. If you are a smoothie lover, I hope you enjoy it as well.

Smoothies are great because they have everything - fruit, antioxidants and protein all in a quick refreshing beverage that is filling and nutritious!

Ingredients

  • ½ bottle (8 oz.) MaryAnna’s® Summer Sweet Tea™, chilled
  • 1 apple, peeled and sliced
  • 2 medium bananas
  • 1 Tbsp. peanut butter
  • ¼ tsp. vanilla
  • cinnamon

 Total Time -  5 min

 Servings -  2

 

Preparation

  1. Process all ingredients in blender until smooth. Pour in tall glass with straw. Sprinkle with cinnamon. Serve and enjoy your delicious smoothie!

Posted in antioxidents, dairy free, tea smoothie

Why Drink Summer Sweet Tea?

Posted by Mary Ann Rollano | 0 Comments

The gloriously warm days of summer are just around the corner, I can feel it. And along with it comes the best drink of the season, sweet iced tea. Good home brewed sweet tea is seemingly simple to make but mastering the art takes a little time. Learning from my mother, I have been brewing sweet tea almost every day for 30 years. My goal is to bring that same wonderful iced tea to you.

I take great care in brewing my tea with only premium ingredients and no artificial flavorings. The best way to make great tasting tea is by the infusion method, allowing the tea leaves to unfurl in the hot water releasing all of its wonderful flavors. I use a custom blend of high quality black tea leaves, flavor with pure cane sugar and add 100% lemon juice for a bit of pure flavor.

Tea is a natural source of antioxidants and growing evidence suggests antioxidants have many positive health benefits. Since our tea is directly brewed just before bottling, it maintains the same level of antioxidants found in a freshly brewed cup of tea.

But what about all those calories from sugar you ask? The sugar I use is pure cane so it is not genetically modified, like high fructose corn syrup. Again, I do not use anything that is artificial in my iced teas.

Remember, sugar is not the devil; you can savor the joy of sweetness if you remember to take everything in moderation. The human body runs on glucose.

One teaspoon of granulated white sugar is equal to about 4.2 grams. My Summer Sweet Tea contains about 2 teaspoons per serving. A gram of sugar contains 4 calories. One serving of my iced tea is about 38 calories.

Here is a little chart you might find interesting.

Calories burned per mile by walking

 

Speed/Pounds

100 lb

120 lb

140 lb

160 lb

180 lb

200 lb

220 lb

250 lb

275 lb

300 lb

2.0mph

57

68

80

91

102

114

125

142

156

170

2.5mph

55

65

76

87

98

109

120

136

150

164

3.0mph

53

64

74

85

95

106

117

133

146

159

3.5mph

52

62

73

83

94

104

114

130

143

156

4.0mph

57

68

80

91

102

114

125

142

156

170

4.5mph

64

76

89

102

115

127

140

159

175

191

5.0mph

73

87

102

116

131

145

160

182

200

218

                      Med Sci Sports Exerc 2000;32 (Suppl):S498-S516.

 

So fill a nice tall glass bursting with ice and indulge in a simple, healthful pleasure. 

It just tastes good!

P.S.  A glass of wine is about 100 calories.

 

Posted in antioxidants, calories, high fructose corn syrup, iced tea, sugar, summer, sweet tea, tea, wine

Hurricane Sandy at the Jersey Shore

Posted by Mary Ann Rollano | 0 Comments

The Jersey Shore scenes so endearing to many of us have been replaced by very sad devastation. 

I built my iced tea company at the Jersey Shore incorporating a beach theme because I love the beach so much. It's the most beautiful, relaxing place on earth. David Turton photographed the original beach scene you see on our labels at Manasquan Beach, NJ. 

Hurricane Sandy damaged many of our beautiful beaches and shore towns. David Turton has taken some incredible photos of Sandy’s effects. They are a must see.

The people of the Jersey Shore love it here as much as I do and we will rebuild.

Please visit the gallery and share this post. All proceeds from David's Hurricane Sandy gallery will be donated to the American Red Cross Hurricane Relief Fund. Thank you so much!

http://davidturton.smugmug.com

 

 Bay Head dunes after Sandy 

This is what's left of the dunes and beach in Bay Head, NJ. The pilings are from an old boardwalk that I think is from the 1930's.

The rocks and pilings were completely covered by a sand dune prior to Sandy.

Posted in Hurricane Sandy, iced tea, Jersey Shore, tea

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